Thursday, March 27, 2014

Project Management, PMP, ITIL, Cost Estimating Business Training & Certification in Virginia

If you're in any way associated with Government contracting, project or program management, project or system cost estimating or resourcing, whether on the job or during acquisition processes and proposal preparation - you may need PMP, ITIL or Cost Estimation Certification and/or training. This is important not only from the business manager perspective, but also from the Enterprise and Solution Architect perspective - it comes in very handy.

Here's a shout-out to some respected professionals at Trio-Consulting and the Northern Virginia Business Center, for an upcoming PMP certification preparation course - as well as many other professional, Federal and DoD contract-focused training and certifications.

Trio Consulting at 3421 Commission Ct, Suite 100, Lake Ridge, VA (Prince William County, near Woodbridge) is offering a 4-day intensive PMI-PMP Bootcamp March 31-April 3 in preparation for PMP Certification in Northern Virginia. Visit the website or call 571-267-1445 for discounted rates today, using promo code "PMPMAR".

Working with the government can be difficult. There is a vast bureaucracy filled with red tape, legal caveats, and rules to navigate once you’ve entered the contract, project or program management role. To be fully prepared, it’s important that you have the training and knowledge to function effectively, for the government or your company. To be truly competitive, and deliver high value work on government programs - managers need to be qualified and even better, certified in standardized project management methodologies. A PMI PMP Certification will put you ahead of your competitors, and make you confident operating under government rules and regulations.

As a source of information for small businesses in Woodbridge, Lake Ridge, Prince William County, and the rest of Northern Virginia, the Northern Virginia Business Center (NVABC) is happy to bring this necessity and training opportunity to your attention. The NVABC, a business incubation and startup facility for Northern Virginia, offers new or expanding businesses help with federal contracting, legal assistance, DC-area digital marketing and information technology, business strategies and planning, and many other advisory services for members. The NVABC's proximity to the nation’s capital makes it a significant, effective source for business training and certification required to address most government programs and contracts.

Trio Consulting, located in Lake Ridge VA, offers Project Management Professional (PMP) Certification training, based on guidance and training requirements of the Project Management Institute (PMI.) The Trio Consulting PMI PMP "Bootcamp" is a 4 day in-depth training course from March 31 to April 3 at the NVABC, that fulfills PMI's 35-hour project management training requirement, and leverages the PMP Exam Simulator for real-time, in class test preparation.

According to Trio, the training is for “Professionals seeking certification to meet contract requirements, organizational staff development goals or personal enrichment.” The course itself is geared not only towards learning the information needed to pass the PMI Exam, but also investigates each of the Project Management Framework’s 47 processes. By the end of this four-day program, you’ll be ready for the test and to move forward with your business.

Additional professional development and certification training is available via Trio Consulting and the Northern Virginia Business Center, in Woodbridge (Lake Ridge) Northern Virginia - contact them as soon as possible to register for the PMP Boot Camp and other professional development classes.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Government Open Data Success Via Information Sharing, Enterprise Architecture and Data Assets

The title of this article is quite a mouthful, and three very complex and broadly-scoped disciplines mashed together. But that's what's happening all over, isn't it, driven by consumer demand on their iPhones - mashing and manipulating information that's managed to leak through the risk-adverse, highly-regulated mantle of the government's secure data cocoon, and instantly sharing it for further rendering, visualization or actual, productive use. Mostly a "pull" style information flow, at best constrained or abstracted by public sector Enterprise Architecture (EA) methods and models - at worst, simply denied.
This demand for open data, however, is rapidly exposing both opportunities and challenges within government information-sharing environments, behind the firewall - in turn a fantastic opportunity and challenge for the Enterprise Architects and Data Management organizations.
The recent "Open Data Policy" compels US Federal agencies to make as much non-sensitive, government-generated data as possible available to the public, via open standards in data structures (for humans and machine-readable), APIs (application programming interfaces) and browser-accessible functions. The public (including commercial entities) in turn can use this data to create new information packages and applications for all kinds of interesting and sometimes critical uses - from monitoring the health of public parks to predicting the arrival of city buses, or failure of city lights.
But there isn't an "easy" button. And, given the highly-regulated and tremendously complex nature of integrated, older government systems and their maintenance contracts - significant internal change is very difficult, to meet what amounts to a "suggested" and unfunded (but with long-term ROI) mandate, without much in the way of clear and measurable value objectives.
That doesn't mean there aren't whole bunches of citizens and government employees ready, willing and enthusiastic about sharing information and ideas that clearly deliver tangible, touchable public benefit. Witness the recent "Open Data Day DC", a yearly hackathon in the District of Columbia for collaborating on using open data to solve local DC issues, world poverty, and other open government challenges. Simply sharing information in ways that weren't part of the original systems integration requirements or objectives has become a very popular - and in fact expected behavior - of the more progressive and (by necessity) collaborative agencies - such as the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).